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August 31, 2006, 4:07 PM CT

Bluetooth Headset X-Sport BTH-11

Bluetooth Headset X-Sport BTH-11
Looks like we have a possible winner of the best Bluetooth Headsets on the market category, the X-Sport BTH-11 made by Teiling Technology is the latest addition to their product line and as per the company, it is the one and only headset in the market with wireless range for approximately 20 to 30 meters, the device also marks the difference by the design that uses a tube to capture the best of your beautiful voice! There are still more interesting attributes, such as a vibration mode and good battery times that go from 15 to 18 hours while using it, or up to 500 hours in standby mode.

The X-Sport BTH-11 is available at i-tech for $89.........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


August 31, 2006, 5:39 AM CT

A New Water Test

A New Water Test
Water is essential for life. Nevertheless, even small amounts of water in the wrong places such as fuels, lubricants, or organic solvents can cause motors to sputter, metal parts to rust, or chemical reactions to go awry. That's why one of the most common lab tests performed in industry is one that looks for traces of water in other substances, even though the test itself is complicated and time-consuming.

A new method for detection and measurement of small amounts of water, developed in the lab of Dr. Milko van der Boom in the Weizmann Institute's Organic Chemistry Department, might allow such tests to be performed accurately and quickly. Van der Boom and postdoctoral fellow Dr. Tarkeshwar Gupta created a versatile film on glass that is only 1.7 nanometers thick. The film can measure the number of water molecules in a substance even when it contains only a few parts per million.

"The problem," says van der Boom, "is that water is hard to detect and to quantify." His method is a departure from prior sensing techniques. In general, such sensor systems are based on relatively weak but selective "host-guest" interactions. In the Weizmann Institute team's sensor, metal complexes embedded in the film steal electrons from the water molecules. When the number of electrons in the metal complexes changes, so does their color, and this change can be read optically. Devices based on optical readout do not need to be wired directly to larger-scale electronics an issue that's still a tremendous challenge for much of molecular-based electronics.........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


August 29, 2006, 6:52 PM CT

Biodegradable dinnerware

Biodegradable dinnerware
It's true, I don't host a number of brunches or entertain a lot from home, but if I did, I would definitely get these biodegradable dinnerware sets, not just because they are attractive (call me boring, but I hate paper plates with designs on them, particularly seasonal and holiday themes), but because they are made of 100% biodegradable, compostable sugar cane fiber, and the utensils are made of 80% potato starch and 20% vegetable oil.

Sugar cane fiber is a renewable resource, and these pieces are much sturdier than paper; thus they're "microwavable, freezer safe, oil resistant, and capable of handling hot foods and beverages." Never mind that some people consider using disposable dinnerware tacky when entertaining (maybe it's a cultural thing, but I grew up using paper plates at every family gathering), but if you'd rather use your fine china when guests are over, consider these the next time you're planning a picnic.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


August 29, 2006, 6:35 PM CT

Acer e310 GPS

Acer e310 GPS
Acer showed off its new e310 GPS system today at the IFA 2006 Germany. The e310 is a portable handheld GPS device that runs on the Microsoft Windows CE. NET 5,0 software and boasts a 2.8-inch large 320 x 240 QVGA Touchscreen display with insight angle. The GPS is powered by a Samsung S3C2442XL processor that runs at a clock speed of 300MHz and also incorporates an integrated SiRF star iii LP government inspection department antenna.

Measuring 5.8 x 10.3 x 1.8 cm, it is absolutely hassle free to carry around and fits your palm with ease, as it is just about the size of cigarette box or may be a touch bigger. It includes a 64MB RAM 64MB of flash ROM. It houses special keys like navigation menu key, two volume keys, and the RESET key. If that's not all, it includes an MP3 player and a photo viewer as well. on the connectivity side, it comes with a USB2.0 and autoloading cable. The GPS can deliver upto 4 hours running time with navigation and a staggering 8 hours when in normal use.........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


August 29, 2006, 5:15 AM CT

Acoustic data may reveal hidden oil supplies

Acoustic data may reveal hidden oil supplies
Just as doctors use ultrasound to image internal organs and unborn babies, MIT Earth Resources Laboratory scientists listen to the echoing language of rocks to map what's going on tens of thousands of feet below the Earth's surface.

With the help of a new $580,000 US Department of Energy (DOE) grant, the earth researchers will use their skills at interpreting underground sound to seek out "sweet spots"--pockets of natural gas and oil contained in fractured porous rocks--in a Wyoming oil field. If the method proves effective at determining where to drill wells, it could eventually be used at oil and gas fields across the country.

A major domestic source of natural gas is low-permeability or "tight" gas formations. Oil and gas come from organic materials that have been cooked for eons under the pressure and high heat of the Earth's crust. Some underground reservoirs contain large volumes of oil and gas that flow easily through permeable rocks, but sometimes the fluids are trapped in rocks with small, difficult-to-access pores, forming separate scattered pockets. Until recently, there was no technology available to get at tight gas.

Tight gas is now the largest of three unconventional gas resources, which also include coal beds and shale. Production of unconventional gas in the United States represented around 40 percent of the nation's total gas output in 2004, as per the DOE, but could grow to 50 percent by 2030 if advanced technologies are developed and implemented.........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


August 29, 2006, 4:44 AM CT

Fuel Cells To Power Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

Fuel Cells To Power Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Thomas Bradley and Reid Thomas go through the procedure of starting up the fuel cell aircraft
Georgia Institute of Technology scientists have conducted successful test flights of a hydrogen-powered unmanned aircraft thought to bethe largest to fly on a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell using compressed hydrogen.

The fuel-cell system that powers the 22-foot wingspan aircraft generates only 500 watts. "That raises a lot of eyebrows," said Adam Broughton, a research engineer who is working on the project in Georgia Tech's Aerospace Systems Design Laboratory (ASDL). "Five hundred watts is plenty of power for a light bulb, but not for the propulsion system of an aircraft this size." In fact, 500 watts represents about 1/100th the power of a hybrid car like a Toyota Prius.

A collaboration between ASDL and the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), the project was spearheaded by David Parekh, GTRI's deputy director and founder of Georgia Tech's Center for Innovative Fuel Cell and Battery Technologies.

Parekh wanted to develop a vehicle that would both advance fuel cell technology and galvanize industry interest. While the automotive industry has made strides with fuel cells, apart from spacecraft, little has been done to leverage fuel cell technology for aerospace applications, he noted.

"A fuel cell aircraft is more compelling than just a lab demonstration or even a fuel cell system powering a house," Parekh explained. "It's also more demanding. With an airplane, you really push the limits for durability, robustness, power density and efficiency."........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


August 28, 2006, 9:08 PM CT

Nanocantilevers Yield Surprises

Nanocantilevers Yield Surprises
Scientists at Purdue University have made a discovery about the behavior of tiny structures called nanocantilevers that could be crucial in designing a new class of ultra-small sensors for detecting viruses, bacteria and other pathogens.

The nanocantilevers, which resemble tiny diving boards made of silicon, could be used in future detectors because they vibrate at different frequencies when contaminants stick to them, revealing the presence of dangerous substances. Because of the nanocantilever's minute size, it is more sensitive than larger devices, promising the development of advanced sensors that detect minute quantities of a contaminant to provide an early warning that a dangerous pathogen is present.

The scientists were surprised to learn that the cantilevers, coated with antibodies to detect certain viruses, attract different densities - or quantity of antibodies per area - depending on the size of the cantilever. The devices are immersed into a liquid containing the antibodies to allow the proteins to stick to the cantilever surface.

"But instead of simply attracting more antibodies because they are longer, the longer cantilevers also contained a greater density of antibodies, which was very unexpected," said Rashid Bashir, a researcher at the Birck Nanotechnology Center and a professor of electrical and computer engineering and biomedical engineering at Purdue University. The research also shows that the density is greater toward the free end of the cantilevers.........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


August 27, 2006, 9:00 PM CT

Turning Fuel Ethanol Into Beverage Alcohol

Turning Fuel Ethanol Into Beverage Alcohol
Fuel ethanol could be cheaply and quickly converted into the purer, cleaner alcohol that goes into alcoholic drinks, cough medicines, mouth washes and other products requiring food-grade alcohol, say Iowa State University researchers.

But there's still a lot of purifying and studying to be done before fuel made from corn is turned into your next vodka or mixed into your morning mouth wash.

Jacek Koziel, an Iowa State assistant professor of agricultural and biosystems engineering, is leading a research project that's attempting to develop and refine two technologies that work together to efficiently purify and remove bad-tasting components from fuel ethanol. The project is partially supported by a $79,900 grant from the state's Grow Iowa Values Fund.

Koziel is collaborating on the project with Hans van Leeuwen, the vice president of MellO3z, a Cedar Rapids company that has developed technology for purifying alcoholic beverages. Van Leeuwen is also an Iowa State professor of civil, construction and environmental engineering.

Iowa certainly has an abundance of fuel ethanol for the scientists to work with. Iowa is the country's leading producer of fuel ethanol. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board says the state has 25 plants capable of producing 1.5 billion gallons per year with more plants on the way.........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


August 27, 2006, 8:24 AM CT

Business Card Menger Sponge

Business Card Menger Sponge
Menger's Sponge - named for its inventor Karl Menger and sometimes wrongly called Sierpinski's Sponge - was the first three dimensional fractal that mathematicians became aware of. In 1995 Dr Jeannine Mosely, a software engineer, set out to build a level 3 Menger Sponge from business cards. After 9 years of effort, involving hundreds of folders all over America, the Business Card Menger Sponge was completed. The resulting object is comprised of 66,048 cards folded into 8000 interlinked sub-cubes, with the entire surface paneled to reveal the Level 2 and Level 3 fractal iterations.

Recipe for a Menger Sponge: Take a cube, divide it into 27 (3 x 3 x 3) smaller cubes of the same size; now remove the cube in the center of each face plus the cube at the center of the whole. You are left with a structure consisting of the eight small corner cubes plus twelve small edge cubes holding them together. Now, imagine repeating this process on each of these remaining 20 cubes. Repeat again. And again, ad infinitum..... To make a Level 3 sponge, stop after 3 iterations.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


August 23, 2006, 9:39 PM CT

New Water Filtration Technique

New Water Filtration Technique Microcystis (left), a type of blue-green algae
A water filtration technique that normally cleans up agricultural chemicals is also effective at removing a toxin secreted by algae found in lakes and rivers, an Ohio State University study has observed.

Engineers here determined that the technique greatly outperformed other methods by removing at least 95 percent of a toxin secreted by Microcystis, a blue-green algae.

Some water filtration plants around the country already use the technique, which couples activated carbon with membrane filters, said Hal Walker, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering and geodetic science at Ohio State.

Microcystis is native to freshwater lakes and rivers around the country, and secretes toxins that can cause liver damage in animals including humans. Worsening environmental pollution in Lake Erie during the last decade has caused algal blooms, the most recent of which began this August.

Some 13 million people rely on Lake Erie for their water supply, so Microcystis is a growing concern there, Walker said. But dangerous algal blooms have occurred across the country this summer, from Massachusetts to California.

And while a number of water filtration plants are beginning to use high-tech ultrafiltration membranes with very fine holes to filter water, Microcystin toxins are small enough to slip through. For example, the toxin used in this study was microcystin-lr, a tiny molecule made up of only seven amino acids.........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


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