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May 14, 2006, 1:20 AM CT

Connectable Multimedia To The TV

Connectable Multimedia To The TV
Eventhough it is simple to mount a computer near the television set to be able to reproduce films or to listen to music, everybody does not have the time or the desire to do it. In that case, Mvix the Player Multimedia can be a good option.

This will allow you to reproduce video, audio and to see photographs, besides its ability to transmit the audio by means of an emitter FM, by which we could listen to it in our radio. It has outlets for Super Video and composite video, a remote port USB and remote control.

Its price is of 249 dollars, eventhough strangely it does not include hard disk, which we will have to add.........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


May 11, 2006, 11:42 PM CT

Light's Most Exotic Trick Yet

Light's Most Exotic Trick Yet Robert Boyd, professor of optics (PHOTO CREDIT: University of Rochester)
In the past few years, researchers have found ways to make light go both faster and slower than its usual speed limit, but now scientists at the University of Rochester have published a paper today in Science on how they've gone one step further: pushing light into reverse. As if to defy common sense, the backward-moving pulse of light travels faster than light.

Confused? You're not alone.

"I've had some of the world's experts scratching their heads over this one," says Robert Boyd, the M. Parker Givens Professor of Optics at the University of Rochester. "Theory predicted that we could send light backwards, but nobody knew if the theory would hold up or even if it could be observed in laboratory conditions".

Boyd recently showed how he can slow down a pulse of light to slower than an airplane, or speed it up faster than its breakneck pace, using exotic techniques and materials. But he's now taken what was once just a mathematical oddity-negative speed-and shown it working in the real world.

"It's weird stuff," says Boyd. "We sent a pulse through an optical fiber, and before its peak even entered the fiber, it was exiting the other end. Through experiments we were able to see that the pulse inside the fiber was actually moving backward, linking the input and output pulses".........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


May 11, 2006, 11:33 PM CT

Rising Price Of Oil Highlights Affordable Energy Alternatives

Rising Price Of Oil Highlights Affordable Energy Alternatives

With oil prices reaching near near-record highs in recent weeks, calls have grown louder for the U.S. to develop new sources of affordable, domestic energy. Work by experts from The Earth Institute at Columbia University suggests that relatively low-cost alternatives already exist to meet the country's' growing energy demand that would at the same time reduce the need to rely on oil supplies from the Middle East and Latin America.

A report published by Klaus S. Lackner and Jeffrey D. Sachs of The Earth Institute at Columbia University that appears in the most recent issue of Brookings Papers on Economic Activity states that coal alone could satisfy the country's energy needs of the twenty-first century. In particular, coal liquefaction, or the process of deriving liquid fuels from coal, is already being used in places and with expanded infrastructure could provide gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel at levels well below current prices. Moreover, they argue that environmental constraints such as increased carbon dioxide emissions arising from greater use of coal and other fossil fuels could be avoided for less than 1 percent of gross world product by 2050.

"[With widespread use of coal liquefaction] the long-term price of liquid hydrocarbon fuels may be lower than it is today, even allowing for pessimistic forecasts for oil and gas reserves," the authors write. "Even with the most conservative assumptions about learning curves, it appears quite safe to predict that the cost of synthetic oil from coal or other processes, after some transitional pains, will be below $30 per barrel." Sachs and Lackner also point out that the large deposits of coal in the U.S. and worldwide make it less prone to the political uncertainties that currently afflict world oil prices.........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


May 10, 2006, 11:22 PM CT

10 Million-Unit Head Start for Xbox 360

10 Million-Unit Head Start for Xbox 360
Microsoft Corp. Chairman and Chief Software Architect Bill Gates today staked the claim that the Xbox 360- system will have a 10 million-unit head start by the time the competition enters the market and more than 160 games by the end of the year. Gates went on to outline the company's bold new vision to connect millions of Xbox 360 gamers with hundreds of millions of Microsoft® Windows®-based PC and mobile gamers from around the world through the Xbox Live® online entertainment network. Gates made the announcements at a press conference to open the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3), the largest annual confab for the interactive entertainment industry.

Dubbed "Live Anywhere," the initiative puts gamers at the center of a ubiquitous always-on world where their digital identities, games, friends and digital entertainment are always accessible through the familiar Xbox Live interface, regardless of location or device. The plan also clears the way for groundbreaking cross-platform gameplay scenarios, with participants using Windows-based PCs, mobile phones and Xbox 360 consoles to play together simultaneously.

By this time next year, Microsoft expects more than 6 million gamers to be connected to the Xbox Live network. In addition, more than 25 million casual gamers are currently playing games on MSN® Messenger and MSN Games. Envisioning a forward look to more closely align these powerful communities, Gates outlined next steps to bring the Live Anywhere vision to fruition:........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


May 10, 2006, 11:17 PM CT

Artificial Vision Technology

Artificial Vision Technology
Becoming Europe's leading designer of powerful chips for artificial vision systems sits squarely in the sights of young Spanish high-growth company, AnaFocus.

AnaFocus specialises in the design of innovative and high-performance vision systems-on-a-chip and mixed-signal (analogue and digital) integrated circuits. The company's vision systems-on-a-chip technology, called Eye-RIS, was inspired by the workings of the human eye.

It is a compact, high-speed, artificial vision system, highly sought after by the automotive security, consumer robotics and surveillance industries. Their mixed-signal product range includes analogue-to-digital converters, digital-to-analogue converters and compressor-decompressors (CODECs) for high quality audio and speech applications.

Describing the use of Eye-RIS in surveillance cameras, Rafael Romay, AnaFocus' Business Development Director, says "If you put the chip in a camera, the person watching the monitor doesn't have to pay attention."

"The chip can be programmed to pick out salient details," continues Romay. "For example, it could detect each person wearing a red coat who passed in front of the camera lens in the past 24 hours. Such a camera could cost as little as $50".

AnaFocus is a spin-off company from Seville's Institute of Microelectronics in Spain, which was founded in 2001. Romay was the company's first recruit. Today, the company employs over 25 highly qualified electronic and electrical engineers.........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


May 9, 2006, 11:13 PM CT

Fuel Cell Powered by Water and Aluminum

Fuel Cell Powered by Water and Aluminum
Fuel cells are the entire buzz now-a-days, but Hitachi Maxell has pushed this cost efficient source of energy onto a new track with the introduction of a fuel cell battery that generates electricity with the help of water and aluminum in stead of just utilizing the external hydrogen and oxygen.

The 16×10x6 cm cost-effective device churns out a cool 10 watts of power, which will soon be pepped up to 100 watts, as per Hitachi Maxell. The fuel cell utilized recycled aluminum scrap that automatically generates hydrogen when reacted with water. Amazingly, 20 grams (0.7 ounce) of aluminum can power your laptop for 4 to 5 hours.........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


May 8, 2006, 11:23 PM CT

Nanotube For Better Composite Materials

Nanotube For Better Composite Materials
By stacking layers of ceramic cloth with interlocking nanotubes in between, a team of scientists has created new composites with significantly improved properties compared to traditional materials. The "nanotube sandwiches," which are described in the May 7 online edition of the journal Nature Materials, could find use in a wide array of structural applications.

"Nanotubes are a very versatile material with absolutely fascinating physical properties, all the way from ballistic conduction to really interesting mechanical behavior," says Pulickel Ajayan, the Henry Burlage Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Rensselaer and a lead author of the paper, along with colleagues at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Some fundamental issues, however, have kept scientists from realizing the full potential of nanotubes, especially when combining them with other materials to make composites. The interface between the materials is not as strong as one might expect, Ajayan notes, because it is difficult to disperse nanotubes and to align them in an orderly way.

Ajayan and colleagues have pioneered a process to help overcome these difficulties, and they are putting it to use in a wide variety of applications. For the current project, the scientists are applying the process to a new area: reinforced composite fabrics made from woven ceramic fibers. These materials have been used for decades in structural applications, but they tend to perform poorly in terms of "through-thickness," or the ability of a material to respond to forces applied perpendicular to the fabric-stacking direction, as per Ajayan.........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


May 7, 2006, 11:12 PM CT

Huge Impacts From Tiny Tech

Huge Impacts From Tiny Tech Image courtesy of http://www.abb.com/
The Center for Responsible Nanotechnology (CRN) today announced the continuation of its first series of original essays in which industry experts predict profound impacts of nanotechnology on society. Eleven new articles by members of CRN's Global Task Force appear in the latest issue of the journal Nanotechnology Perceptions, published recently, complementing the previous issue's collection. Covering topics from commerce to criminology, from ethics to economics, and from our remote past to our distant future, this new collection illustrates the profound transformation that nanotechnology will have on every aspect of human society.

Ray Kurzweil, renowned inventor, entrepreneur, and best-selling author, explained, "As the pace of technological advancement rapidly accelerates, it becomes increasingly important to promote knowledgeable and insightful discussion of both promise and peril. I'm very pleased to take part in this effort by including my own essay, and by hosting discussion of these essays on the 'MindX' discussion board at KurzweilAI.net".

Nanotechnology Perceptions is a peer-reviewed academic journal of the Collegium Basilea in Basel, Switzerland. "We jumped at the chance to publish the CRN Task Force essays," said Jeremy Ramsden, editor-in-chief of the journal. "To us, these articles represent world-class thinking about some of the most important challenges that human society will ever face".........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


May 7, 2006, 10:45 PM CT

Hidden value in 'junk DNA'

Hidden value in 'junk DNA'
IBM scientists have discovered that parts of the human genome once thought functionally obsolete may be important after all.

As published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, regions of the human genome that were assumed to contain mostly evolutionary leftovers (called "junk DNA") may actually hold significant clues that can add to understanding of cellular processes. IBM scientists have discovered that these regions contain numerous, short DNA "motifs," or repeating sequence fragments, which also are present in the parts of the genome that give rise to proteins.

Eventhough it must be verified by experiments, the discovery suggests a correlation between the coding and non-coding parts of the human genome that could have an impact on genomic research and provide insights on the workings of cells.

"Our goal is to apply advanced computational techniques to analyze the workings of processes and systems, in this case the function of the human genome," said Ajay Royyuru, head of the Computational Biology Center at IBM Research. "Using these tools, we've been able to shed new light on parts of the DNA that were traditionally thought of as not having a specific purpose. We believe the innovative application of technology can provide further understanding in the life sciences at large".........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


May 7, 2006, 10:34 PM CT

Mobile TV: The user experience

Mobile TV: The user experience

Mobile TV - The user experience (10:14 min, video Subtitled).

What do mobile TV users say about the service. What attracts them to using mobile TV and are they prepared to pay.

Watch video........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


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