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May 25, 2006, 11:14 PM CT

Reconstructing A Healthcare System In Iraq

Reconstructing A Healthcare System In Iraq
Nurses in Iraq listed building new hospitals, English language training and creating more autonomy and respect for their profession as priorities in reconstructing a healthcare system in the war ravaged country, as per a research studyby scientists at Yale School of Nursing.

A total of 744 surveys were collected from nurses in the Dohuk and Erbil regions of northern Iraqi Kurdistan by field scientists working on the project with Yale. The region has remained stable with only sporadic violence because of creation of the "no-fly" zone in 1991.

"However, a functioning economy does not mean that the reconstruction is complete," said Allison Squires, R.N., doctoral candidate and lead author of the study in Advances in Nursing Science. "It will be an ongoing process. Including input from nurses will be important for ensuring the success of the policy choices made there."

Squires and co-author Ali Sindi, M.D., who is in Iraq, developed the survey. After the survey was translated into Arabic and Kurdish field coordinators distributed it to nurse participants at their place of work and the data was emailed to Squires.

In addition to new hospitals, language training and leadership development, nurses reported the need for new equipment and furniture for patient care, financial support for student nurses, more access to nursing and medical journals and improved laboratory services.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


May 25, 2006, 10:11 PM CT

Sleep More Keep Your Figure

Sleep More Keep Your Figure
You may be spending very few hours for sleep, you try to relax sleep well and avoid weight gain, that's the message from a recently published study. This interesting study has found that women who sleep 5 hours or less are more prone to weight gain compared to women who sleep 7 hours. Researchers presented this study in the American Thoracic Society International conference in May 2006.

The study was interesting because it showed that women who sleep 5 hours or less per day were 32 percent more at risk of developing significant weight gain compared to women who get 7 hours of sleep. The criteria for significant weight gain mentioned above was a gain in weight of 33 pounds or more. The results of this study also indicated that women who sleep 5 hours or less have 15 percent higher risk of developing obesity during the 16 year study period, compared to women who get 7 hours of sleep. The group in between, who had only 6 hours of sleep per day, had twelve percent higher chance of developing major weight gain and 6% increased risk of obesity compared to women who get 7 hours of sleep per day.

These conclusions are from a large study, comprising of a total of 68,183 middle-aged women, who were enrolled in the Nurses health study. Women who participated in the study were required to state their sleeping habits and asked to report their weights every 2 years of the span 16 years covered by the study. Even at the beginning of the study women who slept 5 hours or less per day on an average had 5.4 extra pounds in their body compared to women who had 7 hours of sleep. The principle investigator of this study, Sanjay Patel MD, who an Associate Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University located in Cleveland, Ohio, says that this is the largest study of sleep habits and weight gain. Dr. Patel says that, this is the first study to show that reduced sleeping lead to weight gain over time.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink


May 24, 2006, 8:55 PM CT

Adoption Of An Open iTV Standard

Adoption Of An Open iTV Standard
A recent study found that Europeans spend on average 3.5 hours a day passively watching television. Interactive digital television, or iTV, allows viewers to do much more with their TVs. However, for it to become widely deployed, there needs to be an open standard allowing full interoperability.

The MHP-KDB project set out to help equipment manufacturers, and software and content developers adopt the best such standard, says Klaus Merkel, who directed the IST-funded project.

The Digital Video Broadcasting - Multimedia Home Platform (DVB-MHP) is an open middleware system that enables TV sets to receive and run interactive, Java-based applications, broadcast via satellite, cable, and terrestrial mode. It is also adapted to internet protocol TV.

"MHP will allow full interoperability of various equipment and applications. It's adoption is the crucial factor to allow progress in deployment of interactive digital TV in Europe," says Merkel.

"We wanted to help simplify and accelerate the technical take-up of MHP by making expertise and solutions available to newcomers, as well as to more experienced users," says Merkel. The project, which ended in March, created an online database containing code samples for programmers, tools for developing and testing applications, and technical explanations.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


May 24, 2006, 6:55 PM CT

Software Defuses Demographic Time-bomb

Software Defuses Demographic Time-bomb
As a number of baby boomers look forward to their retirement, manufacturing industry bosses fear the wealth of knowledge that will be lost with their departure.

To stem this drain of information, University of Cambridge researcher Dr Tony Holden has developed a software program which captures employees' experience as they work.

Dr Holden, Department of Engineering, designed the new program, entitled 'Lifetrack', being marketed by the US company The Works Software. The software was developed from the results of a two-year industrial research program sponsored by BP, Honeywell Control and Cambridge University to model the social, communication and information dimensions of how staff work in industrial manufacturing plants. The aim was to significantly improve plant safety, integrity and efficiency.

Serious problems at plants have been traced back to inconsistent views of the same operation. With Lifetrack, everyone has the same consistent view of operations to reduce the chance of misunderstandings and reduce the learning curve of new staff.

"Today, knowledge retention programs don't provide anything for capturing tacit knowledge where it really exists in an organization - with operational staff at the ground level", says Dinesh Vadhia, CEO of The Works Software. "The trick is to capture, retain and share knowledge while operational staff are doing their job".........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


May 17, 2006, 10:40 PM CT

Closer To The Customer

Closer To The Customer This microturbine in the ORNL Recuperator Testing Facility is used to test metal specimens to determine their suitability for high-temperature recuperators.
Without warning, the August 14, 2003, power blackout removed electricity for millions of people in the United States and Canada. The next day manufacturers still had no power, contributing to an estimated cost to the U.S. economy of $6 billion.

Meanwhile, in Ontario, New York, Harbec Plastics, which machines complicated plastics parts, operated during the blackout without interruption, owing to an array of 25 Capstone microturbines. Fired by natural gas, each microturbine produces 30 kilowatts (kW) of electricity and virtually no pollutants. The array's waste heat is recovered and used both to heat water and air (in winter) and cool the building space in summer.

Typically, about two-thirds of the fuel energy used to generate electricity in central power stations is discarded as waste heat and then as losses incurred in power transmission and distribution. By the time the power reaches the point of use, total efficiency can drop to 30%. However, efficiency can be raised to more than 70% by locating each power source close to the customer and productively using the source's waste heat for heating, cooling, and controlling humidity in each appropriately sized commercial or institutional building. Since the 1990s the Department of Energy and the private sector have worked together to develop such distributed energy (DE) technologies, also called cooling, heating, and power (CHP) units and, more recently, integrated energy systems (IES).........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink


May 11, 2006, 11:58 PM CT

Should We Be Worried about Nuclear War?

Should We Be Worried about Nuclear War?
On April 11, Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad announced that Iran had rejoined the ranks of nations with nuclear technology. Outraged, the United States declared that Iran must suspend its nuclear program immediately. "All options are on the table," said U.S. Vice-President Dick Cheney, intimating that the army might have to intervene.

Are we closer than ever to the first nuclear conflict since 1945? "The more fingers there are on the button, the greater the risk of someone's finger slipping," says Michel Fortmann, a professor in the Department of Political Science and founder of the Universite de Montreal-McGill Research Group in International Security (REGIS). There are five declared nuclear powers in the world: the U.S., Russia, France, China and England. Israel is not officially part of the group, but it's an open secret that Israel has a nuclear arsenal. Pakistan and India recently joined the club, not to mention Iran and North Korea. "And let's not forget the 40 or so countries that could be called virtual nuclear powers, in the sense that they've mastered the technologies mandatory to manufacture nuclear arms," explains Fortmann.

Japan, for example, has several thousands of tons of fuel that could be used for nuclear purposes. "Atomic weapons are already in place, and some are pointed at major centres around the world. In less than 30 minutes, a whole city could be blown off the map if the command were given in Washington, Moscow, or somewhere else," says Fortmann.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


May 6, 2006, 9:34 PM CT

Can our economy survive high oil prices?

Can our economy survive high oil prices?
With oil prices hitting record highs, questions are being asked as to how long the global economy can survive the rising cost of one of its most fundamental resources. Are low oil prices necessary for prosperity or will the high price of oil force economies to diversify their energy supply and address the issues of global warming?

Professor Andrew Oswald is an expert on the economics of Oil and its influence on global trade and employment.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


May 3, 2006, 11:17 PM CT

Australians Too Busy For Lunch

Australians Too Busy For Lunch
While most Australians think that eating a substantial, healthy lunch is important, one in three skip this vital meal at least once a week, and one in 10 rarely or never have it.

A new ACNeilsen Omnibus poll of 1400 Australians shows that people engaged in home duties are most likely to skip lunch; with almost half those surveyed (46%) doing so at least once in the past week.

Too busy is the catch-cry of lunch-skippers - 43% said they didn't have time to go out or make themselves something to eat. A further 20% said they weren't hungry at lunchtime while another one in ten (11%) said they had too many personal tasks to do to fit food into their break.

The more work responsibilities people have, the more likely they are to claim they can't do lunch. More than half the respondents on annual salaries of $60,000 or more said they were simply too busy.

Only a handful of those surveyed blamed their lack of lunch on takeaways being too expensive, fattening or unavailable in their area. Nor were they worried about being perceived as slacking off at work if they take time out. One in five men who don't lunch (21%) think skipping lunch helps them lose weight compared to only 13% of women. Of the one in ten people who rarely eat lunch, more than half (55%) don't think it's important as long as they have a good dinner.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


April 29, 2006, 7:55 AM CT

What Does It Take To Be A General?

What Does It Take To Be A General?
Not too many people ever think about that. Once you do start thinking of it, a lot of things can come to mind, but one of them that usually doesn't is actually the most important quality in a general: courage.

We don't often think in terms of a general and courage. Oh, we expect that they are brave enough as far as it goes, but a general doesn't actually lead his men into battle these days.the general is going to show up on the battlefield the day after the battle, in spotless uniform, to brief reporters about what lower ranking men had done the day before. But being a general requires more courage, in a very real sense, than being a soldier at the front lines of the war.

Imagine youself suddenly transformed into a general in command of an army which has just received an order from the President to attack a particular enemy. Think about all the things you are responsible for - such a responsibility is overwhelming. Even if you win the battle, a very large number of the men and women you command will not survive.there is no way to escape the fact that those dead will have gone into battle on your orders, carrying out your plan. You'll spend the rest of your life, even if it is a victory, wondering if a better plan might have resulted in fewer deaths. It is a crushing burden, and not all men who have the rank of general can do it.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


April 11, 2006, 5:50 PM CT

FCC To Investigate TV Use Of Video News Releases

FCC To Investigate TV Use Of Video News Releases
FCC Commissioner Jonathan Adelstein announced plans to investigate "fake news" from use of corporate video news releases (VNRs) in television news broadcasts. The FCC requires licensed TV stations to disclose sponsored broadcast material, and as per Commissioner Adelstein:

"Let me point out that our rules require disclosure even if media outlets themselves were not paid to run the outside programming. In our notice, we noted the law, 'imposes a duty of disclosure on any person involved in the production or preparation of broadcast matter who receives or agrees to receive, or provides or promises to provide, [any] consideration...... In sum, the disclosure information must ultimately be provided up the chain of production and distribution, before the time of broadcast, to the licensee so that it can timely air the mandatory disclosure".

"Say, for example, a person appearing in a VNR is claiming to be an 'expert' on technological gadgets, but is in fact on the payroll of certain gadget makers that are plugged in the broadcast. That person is mandatory by law to disclose that information, and the broadcast station in turn has a duty to inform the public at the time of airing, even if the station itself received no consideration."

"If the Commission determines that a licensee has violated the law, we may impose monetary fines of up to $32,500 per violation, and initiate license revocation proceedings. In addition, the failure to disclose is a crime, carrying a penalty of up to $10,000, and as much as one year imprisonment".........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink


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