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Fri, 21 Nov 2008 04:31:08 GMT

Fests and events

Fests and events
In a week-long retrospective, Film Forum begins screening features and shorts by Les Blank, 26 films in all, tonight. Brian Sholis offers an overview of this "capricious body of work" at Artforum.

As part of the Arthur Penn retro at Anthology Film Archives, Night Moves screens Sunday, Tuesday and November 23. Kevin Lee: "Arthur Penn''s contribution to the mid-70s Hollywood revival of film noir reflects all of the bitter disillusionment and vertiginous, disempowering truth borne by the fallout of Watergate on American society."

Posted by: dwhudson      Read more     Source


Sun, 09 Nov 2008 19:28:25 GMT

Tiny Horse

This miniature horse just has to get out! He can''t be confined by the pen anymore. Unfortunately, his miniature brain just has him running in circles. I WANT!


Posted by: Kevin      Read more     Source


Wed, 22 Oct 2008 20:45:09 GMT

The Real Bentley Continental Makes an Unexpected Appearance

The Real Bentley Continental Makes an Unexpected Appearance
Everyone has a favorite classic car and the Bentley Continental is mine. The long hood and fastback configuration based on a luxurious but sporting chassis set off with a typically English wood-and-leather interior, makes for an elegant carriage suited to high-speed drives through the Europe of the 50s and 60s. Examples are relatively rare but the car above will be a highlight of the RM London auction on the 29th of October. A 1938 Bugatti Atalante, one of only three 1932 Bentley short chassis 8-litre Coupes, and a beautiful 1963 Ferrari 250 California Spyder, are among the extraordinary cars to be sold. Getting back to the well-named Continental, it was recently test-driven by Classic Inside's Steve Wakefield, who gets to do everything I can only dream about. I encourage you to read his story here. But all is not lost for an automobile journalist who lives on Canada's Vancouver Island. Last summer, while using the BC Ferry shortcut from Mill Bay to Brentwood, thus saving me a lengthy drive over the Malahat mountain road, I stopped for a coffee. And what should I behold but a Bentley Continental, parked next to a market store! It was in fine condition although no trailer queen; obviously used as a daily driver. I hung around, hoping to chat with the owner but eventually had to leave, otherwise I'd miss the ferry and be stuck with a 2-hour wait at a deserted dock.

[Photo: Classic Driver]

Posted by: Philip Powell      Read more     Source


Wed, 22 Oct 2008 11:26:23 GMT

Turkey feathers

Turkey feathers


We’re always seeing feathers on the ground at Roundrock. Most of the feathers we find are from turkeys who are finished with them. I suspect that most of the other birds in our woods molt their feathers, but they tend to be smaller and more easily overlooked (though we do find some). But it’s generally turkey feathers we find.

We see turkeys most commonly in the spring and fall. This time of the year we tend to come upon them along our northern property line. Coincidentally, our neighbor has a large crop field just across the fence, and we often see them gleaning some grain from there. When they see us driving up, they bolt for the protection of the forest, which takes them directly across the very road we’re driving on. It doesn’t make sense to my advanced primate mind, but I suppose those turkey are obeying some command of their instinct to run for cover when danger threatens.

There are a few large flocks in the greater area around Roundrock. We often see one of them — numbering close to twenty individuals — at the bottom of the hill after we lurch the truck down the gravel road off of the paved road. They’re always in this same spot. I suppose they could be collecting grit from the gravel for their crops. A large cedar just on the side of the road hides our approach until we are close to them, but they quickly bolt for the trees, some running across the meadow and others flying for the trees. I know it’s too much to expect for them to understand I am not a threat, and I try not to take it personally, but I have feelings just like everyone.

We sometimes see another flock at the top of the ridge on the other side of the valley. This places them closer to our 80+ acres, and they may be the same birds we see in there on occasion.

My neighbors do a lot to create food plots and habitat for birds, including turkeys and quail. I’m sure they do this so they can hunt the birds, and I understand the sport and the need for careful game management. If some of those birds happen to spill onto our land, I don’t mind.

Missouri calendar:

  • Beavers are active during the day, gathering winter food.
Today in Missouri history:

  • Boatmen''s Bank, the oldest bank west of the Mississippi River for many years, was established on this date in 1847.
  • Chuck Berry is born in St. Louis on this date in 1926.

Posted by: Roundrockjournal      Read more     Source


Fri, 17 Oct 2008 02:29:15 GMT

Hunger gives bootstrappers their edge

Hunger gives bootstrappers their edge
Photo courtesy of iStockphoto, Skip ODonnell

(Editor's Note: Entrepreneur Cristian Dorobantescue interviews Mike Michalowicz about the ultimate bootstrapper advantage. )

I've recently had the chance of interviewing Mike Michalowicz , serial entrepreneur and author of the book The Toilet Paper Entrepreneur.

One of the subjects we had approached was starting a business on the cheap with little or no outside investment. Mike says that "no money puts you in hunting mode. You are hungry from day one. And someone that is hungry will go out and will approach things in a different, unorthodox way to make money. The person that walks in with lots of cash, doesn't have to hunt immediately and isn't punished for being lazy or making mistakes. I bet on the person living their passion and without a penny to their name over the funded players every time."

(More)

Posted by: Shawn Hessinger      Read more     Source


Fri, 10 Oct 2008 04:05:54 GMT

Pusan 08

Pusan 08
"There were fireworks over the Yachting Center on Thursday night as the 13th running of the Pusan Int''l Film Festival got underway in South Korea." A report from Patrick Frater and Marcus Lim for Variety, which, along with the Hollywood Reporter, has a special Pusan section up and running.

Fionnuala Halligan reviews the opening film for Screen Daily: "Rustem Abdrashev''s somewhat over-saccharined story of an orphaned exile in 1940s Kazakhstan instantly joins the ranks of films like Kolya and Cinema Paradiso - in which gruff, lonely, elderly men change the lives of photogenic young boys and rake it in at the box office in the process. Gorgeously shot and composed, The Gift to Stalin won''t appeal to cineastes, who may feel they''ve seen it all before, but despite some narrative hiccups this is still the type of accessible foreign-language film which used to charm general audiences in droves (Burnt by the Son, Il Postino, et al)."

Updated through 10/6.

Posted by: dwhudson      Read more     Source


Tue, 07 Oct 2008 04:20:16 GMT

How to Lose Friends & Alienate People.

How to Lose Friends & Alienate People.
"Based on Toby Young''s comic memoir of the same title, the crushingly unfunny and slopped-together How to Lose Friends & Alienate People has neither the ambition nor the intelligence to do justice to its source material," writes Manohla Dargis in the New York Times.

"It''s silly but mostly entertaining, and [Simon] Pegg''s open, expressive face is always funny," writes the Guardian''s Peter Bradshaw. "Perhaps without entirely realising it, the movie provides a through-the-looking-glass satirical version of Ugly Betty and The Devil Wears Prada."

Posted by: dwhudson      Read more     Source


Tue, 07 Oct 2008 04:17:50 GMT

Rumination Rock

Rumination Rock


Long-time readers may remember an earlier post I made about leaving some colored glass “gemstones” on Rumination Rock at my forest. I wondered if the local wildlife might collect them and carry them off.

One stone disappeared right away. One washed off the stone and turned up in the leave litter below it when I poked around. On my last visit to the rock, all of the stones were gone. Were they picked up by critters to embellish a nest or den? I’d like to think so, but I don’t think I’ll ever find out.

Regardless, I’ve added these “dragon’s tears” to Rumination Rock now. Let’s see if they disappear too.

I don’t know if this happens in your neighborhood, but some organizations or individuals will put a folded piece of paper in a ziploc bag, put a few of these stones (or just common gravel) then drive by, tossing the bags onto driveways. Sometimes they are advertisements for handyman services or the like. Just as often, they are elaborate prayers that I’m invited to recite to save my soul. (There is also someone who periodically staples a half dozen prayers on slips of paper to the trunks of trees in front of houses.)

Slowly these stones are finding their way to Roundrock. The gravel gets added to the road. These bits of colored glass go to Rumination Rock. (I have four more now waiting for my next trip.)

Missouri calendar:

  • Muskies become active.
Today in Missouri history:

  • Missouri’s first state fair was held in Boonville on this date in 1853.

Posted by: Roundrockjournal      Read more     Source


Tue, 07 Oct 2008 03:15:24 GMT

Goodbye Early Retirement

Goodbye Early Retirement
© Sofia Brightsea I once dreamed of early retirement, then I woke up today and watched the stock market plunge once again. Certainly not the first plunge it's taken, and given the fact that this bailout is uncertain, and is not any guaranteed elixir anyway, it may not be the last plunge.

For those of us who feel like we've played the financial game the right way, it's more than a little disheartening. Yes, history tells us to ride it out and eventually the market rebounds, but this has been a long downturn. And there has never been more money in the markets, as the rise of mutual funds has made more and more people every year into stock market investors, even if it's only passive investing as far as they are concerned. Either way, prices go down, their nest eggs go down.

While I recalculate the chances of me retiring before age 84, my heart goes out to those in their late 50s or early 60s who hoped to use the stock market as their means to grow their money before riding off into the sunset. Many of them will be working at Walgreen's at age 70 instead of relaxing beachside.

Not sure of the point of this post other than using it as a frustrated, long-winded way to say "This really sucks!"

Posted by: Justin McHenry      Read more     Source


September 29, 2008, 9:42 PM CT

Financial risk-taking behavior and higher testosterone levels

Financial risk-taking behavior and higher testosterone levels
Higher levels of testosterone are correlated with financial risk-taking behavior, as per a new study in which men's testosterone levels were assessed before participation in an investment game. The findings help to shed light on the evolutionary function and biological origins of risk taking.

The study was jointly led by Anna Dreber, of the Program in Evolutionary Dynamics at Harvard University and the Stockholm School of Economics, and Coren Apicella, of Harvard's Department of Anthropology. The results are available online in Evolution and Human Behavior

"These findings help us to understand the motivations for risk-taking behavior, which is a major component of economic theory," says Dreber. "Risk preferences are one of the most important preferences in economics, and yet no one knows why they differ between men and women, why they change over age, or what makes men trade more in the financial market".

Prior studies have shown that on average, men are more likely than women to take risks, and the scientists theorized that these differences could be explained by the role of testosterone. Another recent study also demonstrated that stock market traders experienced greater profits on days their testosterone was above its median level. However, this is the first study to directly examine the relationship between testosterone and financial risk-taking.........

Posted by: Edwin      Read more         Source


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