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October 16, 2006, 9:09 PM CT

Apricot And Cashew Nut Leftovers

Apricot And Cashew Nut Leftovers
I was surfing this morning and this article got my attention.

Apricot and cashew nut by-products can be used as renewable feedstocks to make nanomaterials, say scientists in the US.

George John and Praveen Kumar Vemula from the City College of the City University of New York, US, have used plant-derived resources to make a variety of soft nanomaterials, which are useful for a wide variety of applications.

John started with amygdalin, a by-product from the apricot industry and used an enzyme catalysis route to make amphiphiles - molecules with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts - that have very effective gelation properties, even before purification. John used the hydrogel formed from these amphiphiles as a successful drug delivery vehicle for curcumin, a well-known drug with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. 'Enzyme catalysis was used as a tool to make and break the hydrogels, which triggered controlled drug delivery,' said John.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


October 16, 2006, 8:56 PM CT

Could Dreams Be A Mechanism To Help Us Prepare For Danger?

Could Dreams Be A Mechanism To Help Us Prepare For Danger?
Dreams have been interpreted in a number of different ways through the ages: as messages from the gods, repressed sexual fantasies. or, based on an evolutionist approach that emerged around the turn of the millennium, as a mechanism that helps us to prepare survival strategies in the face of danger.

Antonio Zadra, a professor in the Department of Psychology, likes that last theory. "Among its merits is that it lets us formulate hypotheses that can be tested quite easily," says Zadra, whose initial study tested no fewer than eight hypotheses derived from the new approach.

The theory was developed by Antti Revonsuo, Director of the Consciousness Research Group at the Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Turku in Finland. He postulates that dreams developed in our long-ago ancestors to simulate outside threats, enabling the dreamer to put into practice or rehearse avoidance behaviours.

Pleistocene man faced constant threats from predators, rival tribes, and forces of nature. Seeking ways to avoid danger, our ancestors lived in a perpetual state of alert, and so the dream function assumed the form we see today. The theory is also based on the fact that rehearsing an action in your mind can improve the motor skills needed.

Research on dreams lends some credence to the theory. Research in the 1960s showed that 80% of dreams are negative in content, and misfortune occurs seven times more often than good fortune in dreams. In 96% of cases where there is some interaction with an animal, there is aggression. For both men and women, enemies are nearly always strangers - male strangers.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


October 16, 2006, 8:33 PM CT

Anthropologie Dual Layered Skirt

Anthropologie Dual Layered Skirt
This skirt was the precursor to my skirt addiction. I purchased it from Anthrolpologie online. Skirts weren't really my thing, but the picture on the website was gorgeous and it was unique, so I plunked down the cash for it. The first time I wore it I felt kind of awkward, so I stuck it back into my closet to "marinate".

It was a black linen skirt with lace trim that TRULY got me going on the skirt addiction, just a couple months later. Once that was in full swing I was grateful for this skirt.

It is two layers. The bottom layer is tissue thin pumpkin colored silk. The layer above is crinkled cranberry silk chiffon. It is a circle cut, so it is another one of my fun "spinny" skirts.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


October 16, 2006, 8:29 PM CT

When J.Lo Gyrates With Another Man

When J.Lo Gyrates With Another Man
A husband would surely be green with envy, when he sees his wife getting raunchy with another man, even if it's solely for the cameras.

And Marc Anthony can certainly not be blamed for leaving after two minutes of singer/actress wife Jennifer Lopez's video shoot with raunchy rapper LL Cool J.

According to the sexy hip-hop hunk, Anthony apparently couldn't tolerate the shoot of the racy sequence, and hence did a runner right after he started to get a groove on with his missus for the video "Control Myself".

"We had a lot of chemistry going on. So when Jen's husband came on set - he was only there for a minute before he left again," The Mirror quoted the 38-year-old stud, as saying.

ANO-HTTabloid.com.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


October 15, 2006, 8:55 PM CT

Software To Calculate Heart Attack Risk

Software To Calculate Heart Attack Risk
Pioneering computer software is helping doctors to decide how best to treat patients admitted to hospital with suspected heart attacks.

An international consortium of researchers, led by the University of Edinburgh, has developed a programme that enables doctors to swiftly assess the severity of a patient's condition. The new 'risk calculator' is already being used in British hospitals.

Doctors using the new system take key data from patients at their bedside, and input it into the specially-devised programme. Key facts - such as a patient's age, medical history and blood pressure - are recorded by doctors, as well as information derived from on-the-spot blood samples and kidney tests.

The new patient's statistical profile is then input into a computer and matched with data derived from thousands of other coronary cases. Using the outcomes of these prior cases as a guide, the computer will not only give an accurate assessment of the new patient's conditions, but also recommend possible therapy. Significantly, it will be able to predict the likelihood the patient suffering a heart attack, and even their chances of dying in the next months.

Chest pain accounts for more than a quarter of all emergency medical admissions in the United Kingdom. Spotting high risk heart patients quickly can be difficult, but Professor Keith Fox, of the University of Edinburgh, says the new tool will help: "Identifying those with threatened heart attack from the very a number of patients with chest pain is a real clinical challenge, but critically important in guiding emergency and subsequent patient care. Higher risk patients need more intensive medical and interventional therapy".........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


October 12, 2006, 9:34 PM CT

Microsoft Zune

Microsoft Zune
Now here's something that will give the Apple iPods a run for their money. and they may actually have a chance in hell of succeeding.

Microsoft has just unveiled the Zune brand media player. Microsoft claims that the Zune experience centers around connection - connection to your library, connection to friends, connection to community and connection to other devices.

With a suggested retail price of approximately $249.99, Zune will be available this holiday season in the United States in black, brown or white. Zune comes in a 30GB digital media player that features wireless technology, a built-in FM tuner and a 3-inch screen that allows users to play music, pictures and video.

The biggest hook for this device is its Zune-to-Zune sharing feature. Just by coming in close proximity to your Zune wearing friends, you will be able to wirelessly share full-length sample tracks of select songs, homemade recordings, playlists or pictures with one another. They can listen to them 3 times, or 3 days, whichever comes first. If they wish, they can flag the songs right on your device and easily purchase it from the Zune Marketplace. Initially though, Microsoft will only sell music, but no video.

As per CNN.Com Technology page, Microsoft announced that it will sell a subscription pass for $14.99 a month, allowing the user to listen to any songs in the Zune Martketplace. However, after the pass expires, the user will not be able to access those songs.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


October 12, 2006, 5:17 AM CT

In Wake Of Horse Slaughter Bill

In Wake Of Horse Slaughter Bill
The American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act, making its way from the U.S. House to the Senate, could leave thousands of horses with no final resting ground.

Composting may be an environmentally friendly option that fits in the "circle of life" frame of mind and may be less emotional, two area researchers said.

On Sept. 7 the House approved the Act, which bans the slaughter of horses for human consumption by a vote of 263-146. The Senate has yet to schedule the issue for consideration.

Approximately 90,000 horses, or 1 percent of the U.S. horse population, is slaughtered annually, said Dr. Lance Baker, West Texas A&M University associate professor of animal science.

"If they don't go to slaughter, they will have to go somewhere else," Baker said.

The options for dealing with a carcass are burial, rendering, landfill disposal, incineration, composting or bio-digesting, he said. Many of these are costly, and a horse owner often has to pay to put the horse down and for its disposal, instead of getting money for the animal.

Large-carcass composting is a growing and accepted practice among feedyards and dairies, said Dr. Brent Auvermann, a Texas Agricultural Experiment Station agricultural engineer who has researched the process for about five years.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


October 10, 2006, 10:31 PM CT

EPA to monitor water systems

EPA to monitor water systems
Sandia National Laboratories scientists are working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), University of Cincinnati and Argonne National Laboratory to develop contaminant warning systems that can monitor municipal water systems to determine quickly when and where a contamination occurs.

It's all part of the EPA's Threat Ensemble Vulnerability Assessment (TEVA) program to counter threats against water systems. The program uses a computational framework containing a suite of software tools that can simulate threats and identify vulnerabilities in drinking water systems, measure potential public health impacts, and evaluate mitigation and response strategies.

The EPA became especially concerned about potential water system contamination after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on Washington, D.C. and New York.

U.S. water systems consist of large networks of storage tanks, valves, and pipes that transport clean water to customers over vast areas. By the very nature of their design, they provide multiple points for potential contamination -- either accidental or intentional.

Sandia is a National Nuclear Security Administration laboratory.

"Our involvement dates back about three years ago when the EPA became aware of some LDRD [internally-funded Laboratory Directed Research and Development program] research we were doing to model threat assessments to water systems," says Sean McKenna, Sandia project researcher. "We started working with the EPA in March 2003".........

Posted by: John      Permalink         Source


October 10, 2006, 10:14 PM CT

Research Development And Economic Growth

Research Development And Economic Growth impact of R&D on the economy
New calculations from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) suggest research and development (R&D) accounted for a substantial share of the resurgence in U.S. economic growth in recent years. Using data from the National Science Foundation's (NSF) annual surveys of government, academic, industry and non-profit R&D expenditures, the bureau determined R&D contributed 6.5 percent to economic growth between 1995 and 2002.

Some 40 percent of the nation's productivity and growth is unaccounted for in the gross domestic product (GDP), as per BEA Director Steve Landefeld. That's mainly because reliable data in some economic sectors simply don't exist.

NSF and agencies in a number of other nations collect extensive R&D expenditure data because R&D is vital to economic growth and social welfare, and often results in unimagined benefits. Indeed, the resources organizations devote to R&D influence both economic growth and international competitiveness.

In 2004, NSF's Division of Science Resources Statistics (SRS) enter into a multi-year agreement with BEA to use data from R&D expenditure surveys SRS routinely collects to produce an R&D "satellite account" -a supplemental set of data that can be factored into economic measurements--to determine the impact of R&D spending by various organizations on U.S. growth and productivity.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


October 10, 2006, 10:09 PM CT

Who wants to be a Grid millionaire?

Who wants to be a Grid millionaire?
The worlds largest scientific Grid has reached a major milestone, dealing with over a million programs each month for the last six months. Scientists submitting programs to the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE (EGEE) project range from biochemists simulating drugs for malaria to geophysicists analysing oil and gas fields. UK sites play a key role in EGEE, running around a fifth of all the programs this year.

Twenty-one sites at universities and research centres around the UK are part of the EGEE Grid, contributing nearly five thousand central processing units (CPUs). Dr Robin Middleton of CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire is a former Chair of the EGEE management board. He comments, "From the latest figures, its clear that EGEE now runs a Grid thats being used extensively by scientists in the UK and worldwide. We're very pleased that the UK can play such a major role in this ground-breaking project".

The EGEE Grid has clusters of hundreds and even thousands of PCs, in institutes and universities around the world in total over 25,000 CPUs are involved. Several million gigabytes of data storage in disk and tape facilities also contribute to make EGEE the worlds largest scientific Grid infrastructure.

In the UK, particle physicists from the GridPP project are among the major providers and users of the Grid. Robert Aymar, Director General of CERN, the worlds largest particle physics laboratory, emphasized the importance of this Grid infrastructure. "We are just over one year away from the anticipated launch of the Large Hadron Collider, or LHC, based at CERN. We expect this device will open up new horizons in particle physics," said Dr. Aymar. "Thousands of physicists around the world will need to use the Grid to access and analyse their data. The EGEE infrastructure is a key element in making the LHC Computing Grid possible, and thus the success of the LHC is linked to the success of the EGEE project".........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


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