Back to the main page

Archives Of Media Blog

Subscribe To Media Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?


August 18, 2006, 8:56 PM CT

Cheap and Chic at Yank

Cheap and Chic at Yank
A perfect marriage of right-this-minute trends and cheap, cheap prices. Yank feels more feminine chic rather than modern sleek but you'll find colors and styles that play off fashion themes without being extreme. The site is a joy with large photos, detailed descriptions, wishlists, gift cards and easy ways to shop by collections or from their ads. Don't miss the sale section where we found tops up to 80% off.

This tank top with palettes would give a little sparkle (yeah we know that "sparkle" isn't a style this fall but whatever) under any of the menswear inspired jackets you see everywhere. And it's only $10.99 down from $44.

Shop at :: Yank Clothing........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


August 18, 2006, 6:45 AM CT

Have you ever seen an elephant running?

Have you ever seen an elephant running? Image courtesy of John Hutchinson, The Rotal Veterinary College
A young elephant steps out at Whipsnade Wild Animal Park while cameras record the movement of the disc shaped markers on its legs and back.

(Images: John Hutchinson).........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


August 18, 2006, 6:38 AM CT

Core Needle Biopsy Gives An Accurate Picture

Core Needle Biopsy Gives An Accurate Picture
The gene expression profile detected in the core needle biopsy of a breast tumour is representative of gene expression in the whole tumour. A study published recently in the open access journal Breast Cancer Research confirms the reliability of core needle biopsy as a tool in breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The study also shows that the gene expression profile of a core needle biopsy might be more accurate than the profile of a surgical sample taken from the same tumour, after the biopsy was carried out. As per the study results, the biopsy procedure seems to trigger the expression of genes involved in wound healing as well as tumour invasion and metastasis, thus modifying the gene expression profile of subsequent surgical samples.

Rosanna Zanetti-Dällenbach from the Women's University Hospital in Basel, Switzerland and his colleagues from Stiftung Tumorbank, OncoScore AG and University Hospital in Basel, analysed the gene expression profile of core needle biopsies taken from 22 women diagnosed with breast cancer. For each woman, they compared the biopsy expression profile with the expression profile of a surgical sample taken from the tumour subsequently to the core needle biopsy. Zanetti-Dällenbach et al. quantified the expression of 60 genes known to be involved in breast tumour development using a technique called reverse polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Zanetti-Dällenbach et al. also analysed the gene expression profiles of surgical samples taken from the breast tumours of 317 patients who did not undergo a core needle biopsy.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


August 17, 2006, 11:47 PM CT

Spinal Cord Injury Treatment Progress

Spinal Cord Injury Treatment Progress
The body's spinal cord is like a super highway of nerves. When an injury occurs, the body's policing defenses put up a roadblock in the form of a scar to prevent further injury, but it stops all neural traffic from moving forward.

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University, Drexel University and the University of Arkansas bypassed this roadblock in the spinal cord. First, the researchers regenerated the severed nerve fibers, also called axons, around the initial large lesion with a segment of peripheral nerve taken from the leg of the same animal that suffered the spinal injury. Next, they jump started neural traffic by allowing many nerve fibers to exit from the end of the bridge. This was accomplished, for the first time, by using an enzyme that stopped growth inhibitory molecules from forming in the small scar that forms at the exit ramp of the bridge, where it is inserted into the spinal cord on the other side of the lesion. This allowed the growing axons to reconnect with the spinal cord.

Jerry Silver, a professor of neurosciences at the Case School of Medicine, was senior author among the researchers reporting in the Journal of Neuroscience article, "Combining an Autologous Peripheral Nervous System 'Bridge' and Matrix Modification by Chondroitinase Allows Robust Functional Regeneration beyond a Hemisection Lesion of the Adult Rat Spinal Cord." The other researchers were John Houle, the lead author, and Veronica Tom (a Case alum) from Drexel University College of Medicine; and Gail Wagoner and Napoleon Phillips from the University of Arkansas.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


August 17, 2006, 11:43 PM CT

Some video games promote sociability

Some video games promote sociability
Hang in there, parents. There is some hopeful news on the video-gaming front.

Researchers have found that some of the large and hugely popular online video games although condemned by many as time-gobbling, people-isolating.

monsters actually have socially redeeming qualities.

In theory, anyway.

After examining the form and function of what's known in the trade as.

MMOs massively multiplayer online video games an interdisciplinary team of.

researchers concludes that some games "promote sociability and new worldviews".

The researchers, Constance Steinkuehler and Dmitri Williams, claim that MMOs function not like solitary dungeon cells, but more like virtual coffee shops or pubs where something called "social bridging" takes place. They even liken playing such games as "Asheron's Call" and "Lineage" to dropping in at "Cheers," the fictional TV bar "where everybody knows your name".

"By providing places for social interaction and relationships beyond the workplace and home, MMOs have the capacity to function much like the hangouts of old," they said. And they take it one step further by suggesting that the lack of real-world hangouts "is what is driving the MMO phenomenon" in the first place.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


August 17, 2006, 11:00 PM CT

Advanced Imaging Facility And Hydrogen Fuel Cells

Advanced Imaging Facility And Hydrogen Fuel Cells
Gaithersburg, MD -- Thanks to a new and improved imaging instrument at the Commerce Department's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), scientists now can conduct detailed surveillance on the comings and goings of water inside hydrogen fuel cells--a piece of intelligence key to making the technology practical for powering future automobiles.

With visualization powers 10 times better than those achieved previously, researchers can "see" water production and removal in fuel cells under a range of simulated operating conditions, from arctic cold to desert heat.

"This as-it-happens, inside view is essential because fuel-cell performance depends on a delicate balance," explains NIST physicist Muhammad Arif, who leads the NIST team that developed the instrument. "Too little--or too much--water can shut it down.

"Better water management is fundamental to meeting targets for fuel cell performance, reliability and durability. Reaching these targets, in turn, is integral to efforts to replace petroleum with hydrogen to power cars and trucks by 2020--the goal of President Bush's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative.

In fuel cells, which actually are stacks of battery-like devices, water is the by-product of the chemical process that uses electrons stripped from hydrogen molecules to generate electricity. With the newly commissioned Neutron Imaging Facility, water quantities smaller than 1 microgram (millionth of a gram) are revealed, and details as small as 0.02 millimeter can be discerned in images. Even better spatial resolution is expected.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


August 14, 2006, 11:55 PM CT

Bacteria Can Help Predict Ocean Change

Bacteria Can Help Predict Ocean Change
Every creature has its place and role in the oceans even the smallest microbe, according to a new study that may lead to more accurate models of ocean change.

Scientists have long endorsed the concept of a unique biological niche for most animals and plants a shark, for example, has a different role than a dolphin.

Bacteria instead have been relegated to an also-ran world of "functional redundancy" in which few species are considered unique, said Jed Fuhrman, holder of the McCulloch-Crosby Chair in Marine Biology in the USC College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

In The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences' Early Edition, Fuhrman and colleagues from USC and Columbia University show that most kinds of bacteria are not interchangeable and that each thrives under predictable conditions and at predictable times.

Conversely, the kinds and numbers of bacteria in a sample can show where and when it was taken.

"I could tell you what month it is if you just got me a sample of water from out there," Fuhrman said.

The researchers took monthly bacteria samples for more than four years in the Pacific Ocean near the USC Wrigley Institute's marine laboratory on Catalina Island.

They used statistical methods to correlate the bacteria counts with the Wrigley Institute's monthly measurements of water temperature, salinity, nutrient content, plant matter and other variables.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


August 14, 2006, 10:16 PM CT

Kids with OCD bullied

Kids with OCD bullied
Children with obsessive-compulsive disorder are three times more likely to be bullied than other children, and the name-slinging could cause symptoms of OCD to worsen, University of Florida scientists have found.

"One of the things we have noticed working with a number of kids with OCD is that peer relations are extremely impaired," said Eric Storch, Ph.D, a UF assistant professor of psychiatry and pediatrics and lead author of the study. "Kids target kids who are different. Kids with OCD sometimes exhibit behaviors that peers simply don't understand".

More than one-quarter of the children with OCD who scientists studied reported chronic bullying as a problem, as per findings described in the recent issue of the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.

By comparison, only 9 percent of kids in the two other groups scientists studied - healthy kids without medical or mental conditions and children with type 1 diabetes - reported serious problems with bullies.

Nearly all children are bullied at least once in their lives. But chronic bullying equates to about one taunt per day, ranging from kicking or hitting to name-calling or excluding children from activities in school.

"The kids with OCD are really experiencing higher rates of peer problems than other kids," Storch said. "We're not saying one causes the other, but there is a positive relationship between (OCD and bullying)".........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


August 14, 2006, 10:00 PM CT

Large and small stars in harmonious coexistence

Large and small stars in harmonious coexistence
The latest photo from the Hubble Space Telescope, presented at the 2006 General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union in Prague this week, shows a star forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).

This image reveals a large number of low-mass infant stars coexisting with young massive stars.........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


August 14, 2006, 9:56 PM CT

Insights To High-maintenance Dynamics

Insights To High-maintenance Dynamics
Do you have a co-worker with whom you have trouble working? If you have a co-worker with whom you always seem to be somewhat out of sync so much of your psychic energy is consumed trying to get on the same page with him that by the time you get home you are too drained to do much of anything, never mind read any of those books you were compelled to buy on office politics.

Or imagine Bob, an experienced cook, who shows up at a soup kitchen for the first time enthusiastic about sharing responsibilities with another accomplished cook. The problem is that the styles of Bob and his fellow cook clash so much that later that evening, when Bob is at home, both his concentration and manuscript writing suffer greatly.

Confirming what a number of of us have suspected anecdotally, new research from Northwestern University shows that high-maintenance or difficult interactions indeed drain us. Most importantly, the study demonstrates how those draining social dynamics, in which an individual is trying so hard to regulate his or her behavior, can impair success on subsequent unrelated tasks.

"Luckily, humans are exceptionally social beings equipped with remarkable behavioral repertoires for engaging in effective interpersonal relationships," said Eli Finkel, assistant professor of psychology at Northwestern and the study's main investigator. "But there are plenty of inefficient interpersonal interactions that we engage in every day, and those draining dynamics have significant consequences".........

Posted by: Edwin      Permalink         Source


Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18