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August 24, 2006, 10:17 PM CT

Psychology Of Aggressive Students

Psychology Of Aggressive Students
As the disturbing trend of school violence continues to plague our education system, it is important for caregivers, educators, and doctors to join forces to be proactive in its prevention. A study in the recent issue of The Journal of Pediatrics shows that students displaying violent behaviors often have untreated learning disorders and psychiatric illnesses.

Dr. Nancy Rappaport, a child psychiatrist at Cambridge Health Alliance, and colleagues from Harvard University evaluated 33 students in an urban public school district who were referred by school staff due to their aggressive behavior. The participants' ages ranged from 5 to 18 years old. The authors identified substance abuse in 11 students and at least one medical problem in 13 students. 28 of the 33 students (85%) evaluated had experienced a significant family crisis (such as sickness or death of a parent). 23 had participated in brief or intermittent psychosocial interventions, 5 of which included hospitalizations. 6 of the 18 students (33%) with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder had never received any kind of treatment for it.

These findings reflect the need for health care professionals, caregivers, and teachers to be able to identify potentially dangerous behavior patterns in aggressive students so that proper evaluations and diagnoses can be provided and subsequent treatments be made accessible.........

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August 24, 2006, 10:06 PM CT

Toxic Molecule And Muscular Dystrophy

Toxic Molecule And Muscular Dystrophy Caption: A myotonic mouse muscle with green florescent protein.
Credit: University of Virginia Health System
Doctors at the University of Virginia Health System have shown for the first time that getting rid of poisonous RNA (ribonucleic acid) in muscle cells can reverse myotonic dystrophy, the most common type of muscular dystrophy in adults.

About 40,000 people in the United States have myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD). The disease can cause a slow, progressive wasting of the muscles, irregular heartbeat, cataracts and insulin resistance. Many people don't know they have MMD until their teens or twenties.

To prove the theory that toxic RNA is involved in myotonic muscular dystrophy, a research team led by Dr. Mani Mahadevan, a UVa pathologist, duplicated the disease in mice. "We showed in our mouse model that when you make this poisonous RNA the mice get various aspects of myotonic dystrophy," Mahadevan said. "Then, when you take away the toxic RNA, the mice get back to normal".

Mahadevan hopes the research might lead to new therapies for MMD in the next few years. "If we develop a therapy to silence the expression of the toxic RNA molecule, that would be a viable approach to treat people with myotonic muscular dystrophy," he said. Mahadevan's research in published in the September 2006 issue of Nature Genetics and can be found online at: http://www.nature.com/ng/index.html........

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August 24, 2006, 9:49 PM CT

Microscopic passengers to hitch ride

Microscopic passengers to hitch ride
When space shuttle Atlantis rockets into space later this week, it will take along three kinds of microbes so researchers can study how their genetic responses and their ability to cause disease change.

The 'Microbe' experiment, part of the STS-115 space shuttle mission scheduled for launch Aug. 27, will study three common microorganisms -- Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans -- that have been identified as potential threats to crew health. Sending these microbes into space will allow researchers to investigate the microbes' genetic adaptation and ability to cause infectious disease in microgravity, and to better understand the astronauts' space environment. The results of this experiment will help NASA researchers evaluate the risks to astronauts on future exploration missions planned to go to the moon and Mars.

"Spaceflight holds tremendous potential for the development of novel therapeutics, vaccines and diagnostics to treat, prevent and control infectious diseases," said Cheryl A. Nickerson, Ph.D., the experiment's principal investigator and a researcher at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, Tempe. "Our Microbe experiment will be the first to investigate the effects of spaceflight on the disease-causing potential and gene expression profiles of disease-causing microbes." NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., developed the Microbe payload for flight.........

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August 24, 2006, 9:44 PM CT

Some Faithful Less Likely To Pass The Plate

Some Faithful Less Likely To Pass The Plate Ken Ferraro
Religious shepherds need to keep better watch over their flocks and add activities to keep from fattening them up, says a Purdue University researcher who has observed that some religious activities may promote obesity.

"America is becoming known as a nation of gluttony and obesity, and churches are a feeding ground for this problem," says Ken Ferraro, a professor of sociology who has studied religion and body weight since the early part of 1990s. "If religious leaders and organizations neglect this issue, they will contribute to an epidemic that will cost the health-care system millions of dollars and reduce the quality of life for a number of parishioners".

He analyzed the religious practices and body mass index, often referred to as BMI, of more than 2,500 people during an eight-year period from 1986 to 1994. He observed that the use of religious media resources, such as television, books or radio, was a strong predictor of obesity among women. The occurence rate of obesity increased by 14 percent for this group. At the same time, the more often women attended religious services, the less likely they were to be obese.

Men were less likely to be obese if they sought counseling and comforting through religious sources, Ferraro says.

"This means that men may rely more on religion, instead of food, as a source of comfort during stressful times," says Ferraro, who also is director of Purdue's Center on Aging and the Life Course.........

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August 24, 2006, 9:41 PM CT

Save Money While Treating Drug Abuse

Save Money While Treating Drug Abuse
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a division of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently released a landmark report containing 13 specific principles and recommendations to rehabilitate drug offenders and ultimately provide substantial financial savings to communities. The publication, Principles of Drug Abuse Treatment for Criminal Justice Populations, is based in part on the work of University of Kentucky Researchers Michele Staton-Tindall, Assistant Professor in the Department of Behavioral Science and Center on Drug and Alcohol Research (CDAR) and Carl Leukefeld, Professor of Behavioral Science and Director of CDAR.

Findings from Staton-Tindall's 2003 Kentucky study were used to profile the substance use, mental health problems, health problems and treatment history of incarcerated women. These findings point out the unique issues of women in criminal justice settings. The article is one of only two peer-reviewed articles cited in the entire NIH report.

Staton-Tindall and Leukefeld's research is part of the NIDA/NIH-funded Central States Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Research Systems (CJ-DATS) Center in Lexington. It is one of nine such centers in the U.S. The CJ-DATS Center studies drug abuse interventions in the criminal justice system. The goal of the research is to develop, implement, and test interventions to reduce recidivism, drug abuse and crime.........

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August 24, 2006, 9:32 PM CT

Avian Flu Detection Information

Avian Flu Detection Information
Researchers are now using the newly developed database and Web application called HEDDS (HPAI Early Detection Data System) to share information on sample collection sites, bird species sampled, and test results.

The database is available to agencies, organizations, and policymakers involved in avian influenza monitoring and response. Researchers will use the data to assess risk and refine monitoring strategies should HPAI be detected in the United States. Public access is more limited, but shows the states where samples have been collected and includes numbers of samples collected from each state.

HEDDS is a product of the federal government┬┤s NBII Wildlife Disease Information Node (WDIN) housed at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center. With financial support from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and U.S. Department of Agriculture┬┤s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, and participation by State wildlife agencies, universities and nongovernmental organizations, the HEDDS Web site provides a current picture of where sampling has taken place and the results of testing. "HEDDS provides a critical comprehensive view of national sampling efforts at a time when the demand for this type of information is increasing, along with the growing interest in HPAI surveillance efforts in wild birds," said WDIN Project Leader Joshua Dein.........

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August 24, 2006, 7:54 PM CT

See cats in action

See cats in action

See cats in action.

Hmmmm..............

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August 24, 2006, 7:33 PM CT

Fake Ads

Fake Ads

Interesting collection of fake ads.

Hmmm.........

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August 24, 2006, 6:52 PM CT

Know Your Body Mass Index

Know Your Body Mass Index
BMI (Body Mass Index) is a good tool used for evaluation of overweight and obesity. This index is also a good tool for estimating changes in the body weight over some period of time. The idea of body mass index came from the weight-for-height tables, which was in use for several years. Just like the weight-for-height tables, body mass index has its limitations since it does not estimate body fat content or muscle mass by direct measurement. BMI is calculated by dividing a person's weight expressed in pounds by height in inches squared and multiplied by the number 703.

Because body mass index is not a good measure of body fat content, two persons with identical BMI might not have the same body fat. As an example a bodybuilder with a large bulk of muscle and low percentage of body fat content might have identical body mass index compared to someone who has much more body fat. Nevertheless, despite the disadvantage mentioned above, a BMI of thirty or more generally suggests excess body fat content.

The body mass index table provided with this article serves as a useful standard to evaluate your body mass index. It's rather easy to use this chart to assess your BMI to check you position in the general population, First of all, find your weight at the lower part of the graph. Once you find your weight straight up from that point till you come to he line that corresponds your height expressed in inches. A body mass index of of 25 to 29.9 indicates the person is overweight. Someone with a body mass index of 30 or more is considered to be obese. If you see your body mass index to be above normal range, you are suggested to discuss this finding with your physician.........

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August 24, 2006, 5:05 AM CT

Eating Habits Of Rain Forest Insects

Eating Habits Of Rain Forest Insects
A study initiated by University of Minnesota plant biologist George Weiblen has confirmed what biologists since Darwin have suspected - that the vast number of tree species in rain forests accounts for the equally vast number of plant-eating species of insects.

"This is a big step forward in the quest to understand why there is so much biodiversity in the tropics," said Weiblen, principal investigator and senior author for the National Science Foundation-funded research. The study is published in the Aug. 25 issue of the journal Science.

The research showed that insect species in tropical and temperate forests dine on about the same number of tree species, despite the more diverse menu in the tropics.

"The tropical forest cafeteria offers many more options than the temperate forest," Weiblen said. "Our study confirms that the choices tropical insects make are quite similar to those of insects in less diverse forests of places like Minnesota".

The study rejected an alternative theory that tropical insects are actually picky eaters who prefer fewer host plants than their temperate counterparts.

"Theory predicts that similar species coexist by dividing up resources like food and space," Weiblen said. "The unparalleled diversity of plant-eating insects in the tropics could be explained according to this theory if tropical insects were more choosy than those in temperate forests. But it hasn't been possible to compare what's on the menu until now".........

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