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April 2, 2007, 10:15 PM CT

Primary Medical Care For Children With Autism

Primary Medical Care For Children With Autism
Children with autism do not receive the same quality of primary care as children with other special health care needs, according to research from the University of Minnesota Medical School.

A study published in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine found that parents of children with autism were less likely to report that their children received the type of primary care advocated by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) when compared to parents of children with other special health care needs. The "medical home model," which is defined by the AAP as accessible, continuous, comprehensive, family-centered, compassionate, culturally effective, and coordinated with specialized services was used as a measure for ideal primary care of children.

"This study shows that children with autism are less likely to receive the type of primary medical care that we hope for all children," says principal investigator Allison Brachlow, M.D., research fellow at the Department of Pediatrics. "With increasing numbers of children diagnosed with autism, it is imperative to understand how to provide optimal care for these children".

Specifically, Brachlow found that parents of children with autism were less likely to report their childs care was family-centered, comprehensive, or coordinated. For example, parents of children with autism were less likely to report that their childs primary care provider spent adequate time with them, offered understandable explanations, or discussed outside services, such as speech and occupational therapies. Furthermore, parents of children with autism were more likely to report difficulties obtaining subspecialty care, such as referrals to a gastroenterologist or other subspecialty doctor.........

Posted by: Edwin      Read more         Source


Mon, 02 Apr 2007 03:54:29 GMT

Farm Groups Demand Mandatory Lebels of ‘Country of Origin’ for Food

Farm Groups Demand Mandatory Lebels of ‘Country of Origin’ for Food

Satisfaction of consumers lies not just on the assured quality of food staffs, but also on being informed of the region it is grown. To allow US consumers to be able to differentiate between U.S. and imported food, a small farm-group coaurged Congress to enact legislation this year making labeling of country of origin mandatory.

The National Farmers Union along with a band of over 200 farm and rural groups has submitted a letter to lawmakers on this regard. It was in 2002, the Congress had passed a law demanding for mandatory country of origin labels for beef, pork, lamb, produce, peanuts and seafood.

But till date, it is only for fish such labeling has taken effect. Though the other foods are scheduled to follow suit in September 2008, the Farmers Union urged Congress for allowing the U.S. Department of Agriculture implement the law by September 2007.

The letter by the National Farmers Union and a band of over 200 farm and rural groups said,

Consumers continue to be denied the ability to differentiate between U.S. and imported food.

Our coalition has grown impatient with the implementation delays .... which restricted USDA funds to implement this very popular provision.


Posted by: Irani      Read more     Source


Mon, 02 Apr 2007 03:52:38 GMT

A slice of beef with a pedigree

A slice of beef with a pedigree

August I covered the work done by the St Petersburg Times to expose fish wholesalers who were purposely mislabeling fish shipments to pass off common catfish as exotic grouper. The Times has continued their coverage and the story has been slowly evolving inbody of work.

In a similar vein PopSci is running a pieceThe Future of Personal Security" this item number five is about protecting the fooTraceBack is a new system for DNA testing cattle and swine, and then recording the movements of the butchered meat. A butcher would be able to take a small sample of beef and cross-reference the DNA IdentiGEN database to verify that the meat is from a healthy animal.

It's an interesting question: How do food inspectors find the culprit during a contamination outbreak? Currently it's with gumshoe detective work, but with TraceBack the history of the meat is readily available. Investigators can just compare twenty samples, and the common denominator would be the guilty party. This is essentially a high-tech version of the analog methods used with dry goods; last month's contaminated peanut butter samples were all readily identifiable by the prodcut codes the government requires to be stamped on top of the lid.

IdentiGEN is already providing their services for the UK's Tesco chain, and we should be seeing TraceBack on the American West Coast by the end of 2007.

Posted by johnny 


Posted by: johnny      Read more     Source


April 1, 2007, 9:36 PM CT

How a traumatic memory can be wiped out

How a traumatic memory can be wiped out
French CNRS scientists in collaboration have shown that a memory of a traumatic event can be wiped out, although other, associated recollections remain intact. This is what a scientist in the Laboratory for the Neurobiology of Learning, Memory and Communication (CNRS/Orsay University), working with an American team, has recently demonstrated in the rat. This result could be used to cure patients suffering from post-traumatic stress.

Recalling an event stored in the long-term memory triggers a reprocessing phase: the recollection then becomes sensitive to pharmacological disturbances before being once more stored in the long-term memory. Is drug therapy capable of wiping out the initial memory, and only that memory?

The scientists trained rats to be frightened of two distinct sounds, making them listen to these sounds just before sending an electric shock to their paws. The next day, they gave half of the rats a drug known to cause amnesia for events recalled from memory, and played just one of the sounds again. When they played both sounds to the rats on the next day, those which had not received the drug were still frightened of both sounds, while those which had received the drug were no longer afraid of the sound they had heard under its influence. Recalling the memory of the electric shock associated with the sound played while rats were under the influence of a drug thus meant that the memory was wiped out by the drug, leaving intact the memory associated with the other sound.........

Posted by: Edwin      Read more         Source


April 1, 2007, 9:16 PM CT

Effective Responses After Terrorism Incidents

Effective Responses After Terrorism Incidents
A multi-disciplinary panel of blast-related injury experts from eight countries that have recently experienced terrorist attacks examined and discussed their emergency medical response to blast events and identified common issues that could be used by others to enhance preparedness. The represented countries included: Colombia, Indonesia, Iraq, Israel, United Kingdom, United States, Spain, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey. The study was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the National Association of Emergency Medical Service Physicians.

As per lead author, E. Brooke Lerner, Ph.D., assistant professor of emergency medicine at the Medical College, "Learning from nations that have experienced conventional weapon attacks on their civilian population is critical to improving preparedness worldwide. Our study observed that there were many commonalities among these terrorist events, even though they occurred in different countries under vastly different circumstances. These commonalities can be used by all nations in their preparedness efforts."

The disaster paradigmDetection; Incident Command; Scene Security & Safety; Assess Hazards; Support; Triage & Treatment; Evacuation; and Recoverywhich can be applied to all types of mass casualty events, was selected as a framework to study responses in these different countries. In each area similarities were found. For example, it was determined that detecting an attack has occurred, such as the Madrid bombings in 2004, was not difficult but frequently the initial reports to the 9-1-1 system were misleading in terms of the scope and location of the event. This could lead to insufficient resources responding to the scene or to providers not taking the appropriate precautions against a secondary device. In discussing incident command and triage, it was observed that regions that had a pre-defined command structure and triage guidelines that their providers practiced regularly were able to successfully and quickly respond to events. For example, in London they practice "Triage Tuesdays," where every Tuesday responders triage every patient as if they were involved in a mass casualty event.........

Posted by: Edwin      Read more         Source


March 29, 2007, 10:19 PM CT

Improvements in population data needed

Improvements in population data needed
Every year, millions of people worldwide are displaced because of natural or industrial disasters or social upheaval. Reliable data on the numbers, characteristics, and locations of these displaced populations can bolster humanitarian relief efforts and subsequent recovery programs. On the other hand, the absence of such information can hinder the prompt delivery of aid and impact the survival and recovery of affected groups. Using sound methods for creating these data sets is important in both industrialized and developing nations, but resource-poor countries particularly face large challenges in collecting and using their own national, regional, and local population data to respond to calamities or plan development initiatives.

Solid data help policymakers and others determine how much and what type of aid is needed and where to direct it. However, without a strong organizational and political desire to maintain and use the information, or adequate training, a number of population data sets will go unused or be outdated when they are needed most. National governments and relief organizations around the world should value this kind of information and train relevant practitioners in their own countries to successfully apply it in times of crisis and in any development planning, says a new report from the National Research Council.........

Posted by: Edwin      Read more         Source


March 28, 2007, 10:12 PM CT

Momentum Transfer Under Major Hurricane

Momentum Transfer Under Major Hurricane The eye of Hurricane Ivan passed directly over an array of 14 ocean moorings containing acoustic Doppler current profilers
Researchers at the Naval Research Laboratory - Stennis Space Center (NRL-SSC) have directly derived the air-sea momentum exchange at the ocean interface using observed ocean currents under Hurricane Ivan and determined that it decreases when winds exceed 32 meters per second. This is the first time that momentum exchange at the air-sea interface has been directly calculated from ocean current observations under extreme winds generated by a major tropical cyclone. The complete findings of this study titled "Bottom-up Determination of Air-Sea Momentum Exchange Under a Major Tropical Cyclone," are reported in the March 23, 2007 issue of Science.

Proper evaluation of the air-sea exchange under extreme winds is of great importance for modeling and forecasting used in hurricane studies, such as in forecasting of storm track and intensity, surges, waves, and currents, especially since our coasts have become so heavily populated. These results should be of widespread interest to the public, oceanographers, atmospheric scientists, numerical modelers, oil and gas concerns, commerce, and government agencies, explains William Teague of NRL. This research has a direct impact on storm surge modeling. A number of models have been estimating the air-sea momentum exchange by assuming that it increases as the wind speed increases. But the NRL research definitely shows that this is not the case. This research will lead to a better estimation of the air-sea momentum exchange which will improve both ocean circulation and storm surge models.........

Posted by: Edwin      Read more         Source


Wed, 28 Mar 2007 05:14:33 GMT

Oil Prices Surge Ahead to Three-month High Amid Iran Standoff

Oil Prices Surge Ahead to Three-month High Amid Iran Standoff
Global crude oil surge to a three-month high following Iran`s detention of 15 British sailors and the UN`s decision to tighten sanctions against the country that triggered concern that Middle East supplies may be disrupted. Oil prices for May delivery shot up as much as 51 cents to $62.79 a barrel in after-hours electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange, marking the highest since December 26.

The United Nations has given Iran 60 days to halt uranium enrichment and voted to freeze assets of a state-owned bank. On the other hand, U.K. Prime Minister Tony Blair has said that the seizure of the marines in the Persian Gulf was a very serious situation. Reacting to the recent development Iran, the world’s fourth-biggest producer of oil, said that it would restrict its co-operation with the UN nuclear watchdog in retaliation for fresh Security Council sanctions over its disputed atomic program.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad apparently unwavering over the dispute said that the latest U.N. sanctions would not halt the country’s uranium enrichment even for a second. The latest developments have renewed market concerns that the world’s fourth-largest oil exporter might cut its oil exports to hit back at the West if the relations continues to be worsening.

Iran is the home of the second-biggest proved oil reserves. In addition to it, around a quarter of the world’s oil flows through the Strait of Hormuz, a narrow waterway between Iran and Oman at the mouth of the Persian Gulf, over which Iran has strategic control. Iran has in the past threatened to close the Straits of Hormuz if attacked by the West, a move that would cut off the world’s supply substantially.

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Posted by: Balendu      Read more     Source


Wed, 28 Mar 2007 05:08:44 GMT

Judge Rules Against Vonage on Patents, Court to Issue Injunction

Judge Rules Against Vonage on Patents, Court to Issue Injunction
A US District Court judge in Virginia has stunned the VOIP market by issuing a permanent injunction against Vonage barring it from basing its service on three of five patents owned by Verizon. The permanent injunction was issued on Vonage using the technology to connect users to landline phones. However, the judge agreed to put off the effective date of the injunction for two weeks while considering a request by Vonage for a stay pending what could be a lengthy appeal. Vonage was also ordered to pay $58m ($30m) to Verizon for infringing three patents, as well as royalties on future sales.

The decision would naturally compel Vonage to close or to install new systems. Nevertheless, in an official communiqu issued after the ruling, Vonage reassured its customers that service would continue, uninterrupted, while the company worked its way through the appeals process. The firm has further said that in case if it loses that round, it vows to go to the Federal Court of Appeals.

In the mean time, speculations have started taking rounds that Vonage simply vanished from the scene in no time, which seems to be a bit overstated. But following the belief that the firm’s days are numbered seems to a little appropriate.

Vonage in its defense has maintained that even though it owns no patents of its own, it did not violate any intellectual property in building its business. In its place, the company says it banked on open industry standards available for free to anyone out there who wants to innovate with them.

In Verizon’s original complaint, the company has asserted that Vonage had signed up 1.1 million new subscribers in the 15 months leading up to the patent infringement filing. The firm further claimed that many of them are Verizon’s former customers. Verizon also emphasized that Vonage had signed up around 350,000 new customers in the first quarter of last financial year, and had spent $400 million on advertising and marketing so far.

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Posted by: Balendu      Read more     Source


March 27, 2007, 10:01 PM CT

A Remedy For What Ails Medicine

A Remedy For What Ails Medicine
Today men and women attend medical school in equal numbers. But for most women who go on to academic medicine, that's also where the numbers stop adding up. Just twelve percent of women faculty members are promoted to full professor, compared with one-third of male faculty. Furthermore, in the nation's 125 medical schools, on average there are only thirty-five women full professors compared with 188 male full professors per school. Finally, women hold only eight percent of clinical science department chairs and eight percent of deanships.

Against this backdrop, the National Academy of Sciences and the National Institutes of Health have called "for an urgent broad national effort" to maximize the potential of women faculty in medicine and the biomedical sciences.

Five leading medical schools, Brandeis University and the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC), are spearheading this effort. They have launched a landmark five-year study to explore and address the dramatic under-representation of women and minority faculty in leadership and senior positions in academic medicine. The National Initiative on Gender, Culture and Leadership in Medicine, (also known as "CChange" for cultural change) is supported by a $1.4 million grant from the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation of New York.........

Posted by: Edwin      Read more         Source


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